Five Things Alumni Need to Know This Week – June 18, 2018

Graphic of UCF Football

1. Some scheduling news out of UCF Football: When the Knights host South Carolina State in week two of the 2018 college football season, kickoff at Spectrum Stadium will be 6 p.m. on ESPN3. UCF also announced it has finalized its non-conference slate for the 2019 season with the addition of FAMU as its season-opening matchup.

2. Thanks to researchers at UCF, squeezing oranges may give us a new way to deliver medicine or to detect bridge failures before they happen. Engineering Assistant Professor Andrew K. Dickerson and graduate student Nicholas M. Smith have figured out the mechanics of how oranges release that thin stream of fragrant oil when squeezed. By mimicking nature’s mechanism of an orange layer, pharmaceutical companies may be able to develop a less expensive and less complex way to deliver airborne medication.

3. There is now a UCF Alumni persona on the official UCF Mobile app! Download the app for iOS or Android and select the Alumni experience to stay informed about all things black and gold. For more information about the app, please visit ucfmobile.ucf.edu.

4.  Although the 2018-19 men’s basketball schedule isn’t completely finalized, we did find out which American Athletic Conference opponents will be visiting the CFE Arena. The Knights will host nine league opponents, including two NCAA Tournament teams from a year ago in Cincinnati and Houston, and a pair of teams rich in history with first-year head coaches in Penny Hardaway’s Memphis and Danny Hurley’s UConn.

UCF will play Cincinnati, Houston, Memphis, SMU, Temple, UConn and USF twice during the year, once at home and once on the road. The Knights will only host ECU and Tulsa, and only go on the road to take on Wichita State and Tulane. Fans excited for the upcoming 2018-19 UCF men’s basketball season can purchase tickets today by calling (407) 823-1000 or online: https://ucfknights.co/mbb1819tix.

5. A big thank you to Police Chief Richard Beary ’04MS, who retired last week after 11 years at the head of UCF’s police department and 41 years serving Central Florida in law enforcement.

Five Things Alumni Need to Know This Week – June 11, 2018

Photo of President Hitt and Knightro1. The new issue of Pegasus magazine is out, and it is dedicated to President John C. Hitt H’17 in honor of his 26 years at UCF. The publication is a great tribute to a great man, and we were particularly struck by these words written by Hitt himself: “That’s the modern-day version of a knight: You do what has to be done, and you try to do what’s best for all.” Give it a read, and have the tissue box nearby.

2. The ChargeOn Tour is headed to Tampa tonight at Tropicana Field for the Rays’ game against the Toronto Blue Jays. You must purchase a ticket to the baseball game at the box office in order to attend the program that will feature Director of Athletics Danny White and football head coach Josh Heupel. Here’s the rundown:
6-6:50 p.m.: Pregame UCF ChargeOn Tour appearance with entrance at Gate 4 through Republic Bank Draft Room
6:50-7:10 p.m.: Autograph session at the Press Level by section 221
7:10 p.m.: First pitch of Rays vs. Blue Jays game

3. As Police Chief Richard Beary ’04MS prepares to retire after 11 years at UCF and 41 years of law enforcement service, UCF is conducting a comprehensive, transparent search for a new campus safety leader. Four UCF Police chief finalists will be on campus this month to meet with students, faculty and staff members, and other partners.

4. Hawaii is looking to ban sunscreens with the ingredient oxybenzone because of  research conducted by UCF associate professor John Fauth. Fauth and a team of international researchers in 2015 published a study that showed oxybenzone disrupted coral reproduction and caused bleaching.  Coral bleaching is destroying reef and impacting local economies and ocean species that depend on the reefs for survival. Legislators in Hawaii crafted a bill to ban sunscreens with the ingredient in May. The legislature approved the bill, which awaits the governor’s signature.

5. This week, the Orlando community unifies in remembrance, love and action as we honor the 49 lives lost and those impacted by the attack at Pulse on June 12, 2016. A vigil at UCF will be held June 13 from 7-8:30 p.m. in front of the Pulse mural at the Student Union, and Millican Hall will be lit up after dusk.

In addition to UCF’s vigil, there are several events from blood drives to art exhibits to remembrance ceremonies taking place around Orlando.  View the list here.

Photo of Pulse mural at UCF
A mural, located on the Student Union, memorializes Juan Ramon Guerrero and Christopher Andrew “Drew” Leinonen ’07 ’09MA, two Knights killed on June 12, 2016.

UCF PD Brings New Pup to K-9 Unit

UCFPD-K9
The newest UCF PD K-9, Justice, plays keep-away with Scott during a break in training. (PHOTO: Deanna Ferrante, Central Florida Future)

By Deanna Ferrante
Senior Staff Writer, Central Florida Future

The newest member of the UCF Police Department can’t use handcuffs or fire a gun, but he can chase his tail.

Justice is the newest pup on patrol with UCF PD’s K-9 unit. On his first night of active duty, Justice and his partner, Officer Matt Scott, were called in to handle a narcotics case.

On Aug. 5, Scott and Justice were called to the scene of a traffic stop when another UCF PD officer pulled over a woman who had recently been arrested for possession of cocaine, according to the arrest affidavit.

When Scott and Justice arrived, the dog indicated a positive alert on the suspect’s car. Inside, officers found a purple Crown Royal drawstring bag filled with used syringes, a green USB cord used as a tourniquet, and an Altoids tin containing 28 plastic bags filled with white and brown powder residue.

A sample from one of the bags was field tested for heroin and yielded a positive result, and the woman was arrested on charges of heroin possession.

Justice and the other K-9s are imperative in making arrests like these.

“That’s the call we want the dogs to be at their highest capacity for,” Scott said.

It was a big night for Justice, who has only been with the department for a few months. After Scott’s previous dog Buster was forced to retire due to medical reasons, Justice was purchased in replacement.

While UCF PD put in 480 hours to train Buster, Justice was purchased already trained from Germany.

It’s not uncommon for police dogs to be trained in Europe, Scott said. In fact, he said, for the most part, almost every K-9 in the country is brought in from overseas.

Because of the way he was originally trained, Scott uses German commands to give Justice orders.

The K-9 unit is made up of four teams: Scott and Justice; Officer Chris Holt and his dog, Jogy; Officer Mica Wenner and her dog, Samson; and Cpl. Chuck Reising and his dog, Max. Two of the dogs, including Justice, have been trained to handle narcotics cases, while the other two handle explosives detection.

Twice per month, the four teams meet behind the police department for an extensive day of training.

The dogs learn how to do bite work, narcotics detection, tracking, and building searches. The officers also train the dogs to be comfortable in many different situations and environments.

“Some of these dogs have never been on tile,” Scott said. “You don’t want a dog freezing up because he’s never been on marble before.”

Reising, the K-9 unit’s leader, said they put the dogs in a variety of different situations to get them used to any scenario that could happen while on patrol.

They take the dogs into the Reflecting Pond to get them used to water, make them climb over fences and take them to the gun range to get them used to the sound of shooting.

The dogs must follow their partners’ commands immediately, or they risk the chance of accidentally hurting someone besides their intended targets.

The dogs are trained to run after a suspect and, then, after a command from their partner, to instantly stop the chase and return.

“If another cop or someone else gets close, the dog might key on them,” Reising explained. “We don’t want the dog to bite an innocent person.”

When they aren’t training, the teams alternate shifts to patrol. Their schedules vary, but they usually work 12-hour shifts for half of the month on alternating days during the week.

Because of the long hours, Scott said he makes sure he keeps a close eye on his partner. He must make sure he stops to give Justice water or a bathroom break so the dog is always ready to jump into action.

“That way, when the time to deploy him comes, he’s doing what he needs to do,” he said.

For Scott and the rest of the K-9 unit, preparing the dogs also includes a lot of petting and praising; they want the dogs to be happy when they come to work.

“You want the dog to be excited,” Scott said. “You want the dog to want to be here.”

This story was published in an Aug. 20, 2015, edition of the Central Florida Future online. It has been slightly edited in accordance with AP and alumni association style guidelines. See original article, which includes more photos.